Jesse Jackson's decades in public eye shaped by many roles
11/27/2017 9:35:13 PM

By Sharon Cohen and Corey Williams For more than 50 years, the Rev. Jesse Jackson has been in the public eye as an activist, a two-time presidential candidate and a guiding force in the modern civil rights movement. Jackson, 76, disclosed on Friday that he's been treated for Parkinson's disease for the past two years, leaving unclear what role he will play in the national conversation going forward. The onetime protÈgÈ of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. has taken on numerous roles that have shaped his life. Here are some of them: ___   CIVIL RIGHTS...

Judge won't dismiss discrimination suit by slave descendants
11/16/2017 3:34:04 AM

A federal judge has refused to dismiss a lawsuit that claims racial discrimination is eroding one of the last communities of slave descendants on the Southeast U.S. coast. Residents and landowners from the tiny Hogg Hummock community on remote Sapelo Island sued the state and McIntosh County in December 2015. The lawsuit in U.S. District Court says the enclave of about 50 black residents is shrinking rapidly as landowners pay high property taxes yet receive few basic services, pressuring them to sell their property. Attorneys for the state and county asked the court last year to dismiss...

“For America to reach its full economic, democratic and moral potential, all children must have the opportunity to grow, develop and thrive.”
11/16/2017 3:33:46 AM

Financial success? Report shows race plays major role For those growing up in Louisiana, African-American children may have a significantly more difficult time achieving financial success as adults than white children, according to an Annie E. Casey Foundation report. Poverty and policy decisions that have historically limited access to opportunity for minority residents are two main factors that have contributed to the current disparity, said Laura Speer, associate director of policy reform and advocacy for the foundation and an author of the report. She notes, for example, that the...

Debate over Ken Burns Civil War doc continues over decades
11/16/2017 3:33:23 AM

By Hillel Italie From the time it aired nearly 30 years ago, Ken Burns' Civil War documentary has been a popular sensation and subject of debate. The 11-hour, nine-part series premiered in September 1990 and became one of PBS' most widely seen educational programs, with some 40 million taking in at least part of the original broadcast. “The Civil War” was the rare documentary to inspire a skit on “Saturday Night Live” and helped make Burns, in his mid-30s at the time, the rare documentary maker recognizable to the general public. During its initial...

Despite campaign promise, billionaires’ tax loophole survives again
11/16/2017 3:33:06 AM

The tax treatment of so-called carried interest wouldn’t change in the overhaul proposed by House Republicans, retaining a big benefit for private-equity and hedge-fund titans.   By Alec MacGillis From early in the 2016 presidential campaign, Donald Trump swore he’d do away with the so-called carried-interest loophole, the notorious tax break that allows highly compensated private-equity managers, real estate investors and venture capitalists to be taxed at a much lower rate than other professionals. “They’re paying nothing, and it’s...

Will Texas massacre force military to improve its criminal reporting system?
11/16/2017 3:31:25 AM

The Air Force’s apparent failure to send the criminal records of the airman behind Sunday’s mass killings to civilian authorities allowed him to obtain guns. Such reporting failings are widespread and longstanding.   By A.C. Thompson and T. Christian Miller Texas Gov. Greg Abbott had an urgent question Monday about Devin Patrick Kelley, the former U.S. Air Force airman who is accused of killing 26 people worshipping at a church service yesterday: How was it that Kelley, convicted of domestic violence and discharged for bad conduct, was still able to get a...

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., recently met with civil rights leaders and U.S. mayors to discuss unifying around national issues.
11/16/2017 3:29:44 AM

“The purpose of the meeting was to develop a national agenda and strategy to improve the quality of life of people in U.S. cities ... on national issues of mutual concern.” —Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr.   HED: Newspaper organization head meets with civil Rights Leaders and U.S. mayors SUBHEAD: NNPA President joins Civil Rights leaders and U.S. mayors for historic meeting By Stacy M. Brown During a recent meeting in New York City, the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) joined the National Urban League, the National Action Network and a group...

Black students in the nation’s Capital deserve better
11/16/2017 3:28:27 AM

By Lynette Monroe In my role as the program assistant for the National Newspaper Publishers Association’s (NNPA) Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Public Awareness Campaign, I closely followed the proposal process for the District of Columbia’s ESSA plan. I have to admit, I was disappointed by the final version of the plan submitted to the U.S. Department of Education. Overall, D.C.’s ESSA plan is, at best, an incomplete assignment. The ‘to be continued’ tone of the plan could be partly due to the discontent expressed by many community members during the final...

NAACP PRESIDENT EMERITUS HATCHER DIES
11/16/2017 3:24:21 AM

The Ventura County community is saddened by the passing of a civil rights icon and NAACP legend, Mr. John R. Hatcher III. He transitioned on the morning of Friday, November 3, 2017. Mr. John R. Hatcher III, NAACP Ventura County President and life member, has been a civil rights leader in the NAACP for over sixty years. For more than 38 years, Hatcher was reelected as the President of the Ventura County chapter of the NAACP. Mr. John R. Hatcher III distinguished himself in Ventura County, the state of California, and the nation as a civil rights advocate, humanitarian, community leader, and...

Ford empowers HBCU students to pursue STEAM careers
11/8/2017 9:57:03 PM

Ford Motor Company enables African-Americans in STEAM careers at HBCUs By Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. There is no debate about the continuing historic importance and strategic mission and purpose of the nation’s 120-plus Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). During the 2017 homecoming festivities that are now occurring on HBCU campuses across the nation, I believe it is also important to salute and recognize the companies that financially contribute to the success of HBCUs. The Ford Motor Company has had a long track record of contributing to HBCUs that spans...